I was amped for the Valentino exhibition – after all, who doesn’t like a bit of fashion voyeurism? I was slightly put off by the price (£12.50 eek!) but forged ahead and took myself off to Somerset House.

The clothes were amazing, it was incredible to see red carpet dresses up close. The detail is indescribable – such talent has gone into their creation. I also found it a bit of a mind trip, some of my favourite dresses (that I had seen on TV) gave a completely different impression in person.

The exhibition itself was ruined for me because of my expectations. A few years ago I was lucky enough to go to the YSL exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris. It had the same high standard of design and creation, but the display was a visual feast. There was a corridor of mannequins showing the timeline progression of the trench-coat;  there was clothes grouped/displayed by colour, era, theme and event (pictures below). It gave the chance to wonder at the clothes, but also gave an overall YSL impression – you were in the world of YSL.

In comparison the Valentino exhibition was just the simple white corridor at the top of the post. Great content, but very crowded and I don’t think it did the clothes justice. It was an adequate (if expensive) display of clothes, but it completely missed out on an immersive Valentino experience.

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This secret is not glamorous. It can’t even be called cool. But it is vital to your survival if you are living in London (and I assume any other big city).

When I walk outside in London I start crying. Not because I live in such an amazing city, but because it is windy and polluted and full of cigarette particles. As soon as any of this gets in my eyes I cry like a baby. This results in far too many strangers coming up to me to ask if I am ok*.

The solution costs under £2 and makes you look like a nut case – but trust me, it works.

You need these: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Fashion-Retro-Vintage-Clear-Lens-Frame-Wayfarer-Trendy-Cool-Nerd-Geek-Glasses-/300782466616?ssPageName=ADME:L:OC:GB:3160

I went for the leopard print, but I will let you make your own choice.

Wear them while on your above and below ground daily commute and your mascara will stay in place. Probably good for your eye health in the long run as well.

*Not joking on this one, London is a surprisingly friendly and concerned place

I just saw the latest round of Lacoste advertising and I am beyond excited. The ‘short film’ shows the potential future of the Lacoste polo – one which changes colour at the swipe of a logo and changes shape at the pinch of a shoulder. I know this is all future fantasy land, but how cool would it be if it were possible?

In terms of advertising it is a fantastically clever move. The world is falling apart at the moment and if journalists are to be believed it will not get better any time soon. So what is an international brand to do?

Well, instead of advertising the same unchanged and overpriced polo you imagine what it might become. Some of this magic is then transferred to the current offering = sales. You also then get people paying for the potential future of Lacoste = sales. And you will inevitably get stupid people buying a polo that they think will change colour at the touch of a crocodile = sales.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30lKLG6mzNk?feature=player_embedded&w=640&h=360]

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I know I am a bit behind the times on this one, but I like it so much that I just had to mention the Mulberry AW 2012 campaign. It features a Where the Wild Things Are type scene, with a model decked out in fur playing hide and seek with some big, and furry wild things.

There are three things that I like about it. Firstly – its does not take itself too seriously. I am sick to death of moody skeletons with panda eyes draped across furniture equalling fashion advertising. This Mulberry campaign is flirty, fun and although visually beautiful is just a little bit silly.

Secondly is the clever psychology at play. This campaign instantly makes us think of happy childhood times, which means that we then come to feel this emotion and sense of longing about Mulberry itself. It also makes a mental time link – Where the Wild Things Are has been loved by you for 20+ years, which means you will love that Mulberry coat/bag for just as long.

But by far my favourite thing about this campaign is the story it tells. If you look at a few of the images in the series, it’s hard to tell if the model is playing, terrified, leading the charge or just a little confused. Which (if I remember correctly) is essentially what Max went through in the story.

Good work Mulberry.